How to promote your music? 5 important tips.

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1. Don’t Promote a Bad Track

I suggest getting feedback from respected people in the industry and other music enthusiasts before releasing. I personally have a promo list of 30 producers respected in the house community (it took me awhile to build these relationships). I respect their opinion and taste. If 60% of them like a track, it’s a green light to market and release the track. Why 60%? Think about it, 18 out of 30 respected taste makers from the industry liked the track. The odds of having 60% of my overall total fans liking the track and sharing it with their friends are high. My goal for each campaign is not to chase pennies and cents at the retail stores, but to grow my fanbase and share great music.

If you don’t have a network of tastemakers, I recommend checking out Soundout, it’s a great music feedback service that sends your track to other listeners, and you get feedback a few days later.

2. Market to Your Target Audience

I’ve seen a lot of producers who like to produce tracks in different genres and then market them to a totally wrong fanbase. Some people can’t tell Deep House from Tech House from Electro. Some people see it all as Techno. That’s fine if you are blanketing that fan base as your target market. But be clear what your target market is and what is the messages you want to communicate to them. For example, promoting your electro house track in a dubstep forum or your top 10 deep house beatport chart on an EDM Facebook group, is a bad idea. Don’t do this.

It’s not always easy to decide who you should market to. It took me some time to identify my target audience. Initially they were younger producers from South Africa, Germany and Sweden. Now I have expanded to the electronic music enthusiasts in DC, Baltimore and NYC (the U.S. has always been a late adopter for electronic dance music). My message is catered to them, and I’m closely interacting with them.

3. Don’t Believe the Hype

Perhaps one of the biggest mistakes in marketing is to get caught up in all the marketing noise made by other producers. When you’re inside the bubble and paying attention to every announcement of your nearest 3-4 producers/competitors, it’s easy to get despondent when they get their killer magazine review or are featured on every Beatport Top 10 and Traxsource Top 10. It’s okay to be competitive though. I noticed not a lot of producers are competitive with their music. I’m very competitive and I expect the same from other producers. If you’re not competitive, expect to live in a world of mediocrity.

Those of us that have been around the block tend to not get too worked up by any big announcements. They come and go. They’re mostly fleeting. Life goes on and you have tons of differentiation.

4. Your Competitors Feel the Same

One thing that upcoming producers often overlook is the impact of competitors’ marketing on their morale. Every day you read about all of the great gigs your competitors are racking up and their high profile remixes released left and right. You’re reading their press releases or blog posts. Inside your mind, everything is going to hell in a handbasket and you don’t know how you are ever going to make it.

That’s how it ALWAYS feels being an UPCOMING PRODUCER. You are still learning your craft, you don’t have enough gear, you don’t have access to great vocalists, your network of other producers to learn from is nonexistent, you have no fan base. That is EXACTLY how your competitors feel. And they’re listening to your tracks and thinking, “Shit, they have a good thing going on” or “Uh Oh, how did he get that gig?” Make sure you stay confident.

Producers who started 8-10 yrs ahead of you aren’t the competition, these are your mentors. Respect them and ask them for feedback, which the majority will offer if approached correctly.

5. Build Relationships

Many newbie producers make the mistake of thinking that they can simply approach a high profile producer to remix some of their work and gain recognition. It doesn’t work that way. High profile producers are constantly harangued by over-eager producers. Go slowly. Get to know them when you don’t need remixes. Same thing goes for club promoters or owners.

Follow them on Twitter. Respect their profession. Buy their music. Go to their shows. Ask if you can be on their promo list. Say hello to them at clubs or events. Understand how their job works. Understand that for every track they make, they need some support promoting it, and if you can’t help, you’re not likely to get inches. The more helpful you are over time, the more likely you are to get inches when you need them.

Building your fan base and support network is a marathon, not a sprint. Spread the love out. Your small wins will result in larger wins over time.

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10 inspirational tips for music production

MarkusFrustratedStudio

Source: “Diesellaws.com”

1. Loosen The Grip On Your Mind

If you occasionally beat yourself up for not coming up with something the way it sounded in your head, you’re not alone. The way we hear things in our mind and the way we interpret that thought into our music are nearly always going to be different. This IS a good thing. Allow your inspiration to come through your music in a way you weren’t expecting. It keeps it interesting, fresh and can spark a lot more inspiration.

2. Start Before You Think

Often referred to as “on the fly”, being spontaneous can sometimes kick-start your imagination in a big way. Dropping in a random loop, off beat percussion or quick melody and building a track around that regularly leads to something worth saving. Sometimes, getting stuck with a particular sound, VST or genre can quickly demotivate you in making another track.

3. Remix

Remixes (and bootleg remixes) are great ways for producers to gain some attention. They are also great for breaking free from the ‘freak out’ that can come from seeing a blank canvas. By challenging yourself to remix you will inevitably fuel your inspiration and at the same time learn how other producers construct their songs.

4. Humour Yourself

Got Cheese? Humour is a great way to break up an uninspiring production. Open a new project, lay down some random samples and add some humour either in the form of funny recorded vocals or cheesy sounding synths. Sure it may not be a track you ever show anyone else, but it might just be the kick* you need to jump into the next project with a clear mind. *Pun intended

5. Lay It Out

Some producers may struggle with melodies, while others may struggle with the layout of a track. Whatever your hurdle, laying out a track from another artist you admire may just help you overcome that obstacle. While I don’t recommend copying another artists work, I do recommend gaining inspiration from the way in which they have crafted their sounds, started their breakdowns, changed the riffs and fleshed out their layers; Which may help you get past those technical issues that can block creativity.

6. Enjoy Your Production Space

Most artists will tend to have one main space to which their productions are born. Allow this space to be a place that inspires you and invites you back each time. Some will find the addition of the Internet to this workspace to be a freeing move which can help break up studio time comfortably, especially in the track rendering down-time.  Other additions may be open window lighting, controlled darkness, sound-wall padding, plants, supporting chair and (monitored) alcoholic beverages.

7. Don’t Do Anything

How often have you forced yourself to create something even when you haven’t been in the mood? Producing is a very complex process and can occasionally be slowed to a halt with forced creativity. If you don’t feel like making any music, then don’t. While there are moments when you may need to push on through regardless of mood due to project time constraints (#Tip 2), creating a track when your mind isn’t there can often do more harm then good; Leaving you frustrated and annoyed which can alter your positive perception of your production space and musical abilities.

8. Time Constraints Are Good

If you have managed to gain a project with time constraints, think of yourself as a lucky one. Many producers ( usually including yourself at an early point in your career) would love to have the opportunity to be asked by labels and other producers to create original and remix productions for them. Essentially, it’s the next step up from producing tracks and sending them to labels in the hope that they listen to them, let alone sign them. If the time constraints are really eating at you, it might be best to go back to Tip #1 or #2 or contact the label/producer and coming to an alternative arrangement.

9. Allow Yourself The Freedom To Change

Most people do a variety of different projects at any one time in their lives. The same goes for producers, who often pick up the ‘cousin’ craft of DJing. Participating in another activity that occupies your mind for long periods of time can often alter how you produce; Sometimes making it harder to create new tracks. This situation is perfectly normal and may just mean that you are putting inspiration into your other activity and it may take a little while to get back into the mind space needed for new productions. To counter act this situation, you may just need to play out Tip #2 or even #7 until you decide which path should take precedence.

10. Listen, Watch and Attend

Listening to new music, Watching music videos and Attending gigs, concerts and festivals should be a must for every producer. Opening your mind to ‘research’ via the Internet, or in the physical world will impact directly on your productions. As humans, we often emulate what we hear and see, and as most productions fit to a certain style based on genre (Kick, Snare, Perc, Instrument, FX) the visual and aural learning can only benefit your mind and concepts. Add to that the rapid rise of the digital producer taking his productions to a LIVE show purposely blurring the lines from bedroom producer to live act.